Beef Steaks – Which Steak is best? With cooking methods.

Are you ever confused by which steak to buy?  Let us help you with that

We normally think of “Steak” as something on the “Barbie” – but it may surprise you to know that there are actually 8 different types of steaks – Each is best for a particular purpose and each has a slightly different cooking method.

Then we have the type of meat – Palmdale Village Meats, Poultry and Seafood are experts when it comes to ensuring you get the best possible result from your steak.  That means sourcing the very best, Certified Grass Fed Angus (with absolutely No GMO and completely HGP free) for you – As well as providing you with the best information on how to cook your selection.

First of all – What are your choices when it comes to steaks, and what is the best way of cooking them?

Steaks:

  1. Eye Fillet Steak
    • Beautiful on the BBQ, the most tender of all steaks.
  2. Scotch Fillet Steak
    • Best for Barbeques, nice and quick, very tender
  3. Sirloin (also called Porterhouse) Steak
    • Good for both Barbeque and Stir-Frys.  A very lean steak, too lean for a casserole as a rule.
  4. T-Bone Steak
    • Great for the Barbeque, also good for cooking in the oven on a very low heat for an extended time.
  5. Rump Steak
    • Rump is a steak which is great on the BBQ, but also used for casseroles and curries.  This steak browns beautifully and browning the meat, before adding to your slow cooked meal, can adds distinct bonus to the flavour to your meal.
  6. Rib Eye Steak
    • These are large steaks with a bone in.  They are great on the Barbeque, but are fantastic when slow cooked in the oven, then finished with a quick sear on a hot BBQ plate.  Or: reverse that – sear first then cook slowly.
  7. Minute Steak
    • Literally a minute – 30 seconds each side on a hot plate.  Great by itself or as part of a meal like Steak Sandwiches, Steak and Eggs or Warm Potato Salad with steak to mention a few
  8. Oyster Blade Steak
    • While it can be cooked on the Barbeque, with care, it is absolutely beautiful in a casserole or curry – Tenderising so much in the slow cooking, it rivals Eye Fillet for it’s melt in the mouth texture.

Johns 4 Top Tips for cooking a good steak

  1. Make sure your steak is at room temperature before cooking!
    • (so all of your steak is cooked at the same temperature)
  2. Cook on a searingly hot plate!
    • (don’t let the juiciness of your steak leach out on a medium warm plate)
  3. Turn it only once!  When the juices come to the top – turn your steak.
    • (or it will toughen the meat fibres)
  4. Let it rest before eating
    • (Gives the steak a chance to reabsorb some of liquid – makes for a tenderer steak)

How can you tell if your steak is done?

“Done” is relative of course – some people like their steaks Blue (very rare) and some like it Well Done.  How can you tell when your steak has been cooked to your requirements?

  1. The easiest, is by using a meat probe.  This is, without doubt the easiest, however the problem with that is that it pierces your Steak and allows the tenderising juices to escape.  For temperatures, go by the instructions that came with your probe.
  2. The simplest though, is to use your hand.  Both through touching the steak to feel it’s firmness (steak firms as it cooks) and comparing it to your Thumb pad in different fingering combinations.  This is known as the “Fist Test”.

The FIST TEST

  • RARE: With one hand, bring your second finger tip down to touch your thumb tip.  Then, using your other hand, touch the fleshy part at the base of the Thumb that is in contact with your pointy finger.  The texture/spring of the thumb pad is exactly the same as the texture/spring of a RARE steak.
  • MEDIUM: With one hand, bring your middle finger tip down to touch your thumb tip.  Then, using your other hand, touch the fleshy part at the base of the Thumb that is in contact with your “rude” finger.  The texture/spring of the thumb pad is exactly the same as the texture/spring of a MEDIUM steak.
  • WELL DONE: With one hand, bring your ring finger tip down to touch your thumb tip.  Then, using your other hand, touch the fleshy part at the base of the Thumb that is in contact with your ring finger.  The texture/spring of the thumb pad is exactly the same as the texture/spring of a WELL DONE steak.

 

 

Not sure about how to cook your selection?
Palmdale Meats, Poultry and Seafood – North Adelaide – are always here to help you.

Call in to Palmdale Village Meats in the North Adelaide Village,
81 O’Connell St, North Adelaide.

(08) 8267 5498